Kids With Autism Board A Flight To Ease Stress

Author: Cory Rosenberg Posted on: Monday, 08 December 2014 17:59 1171 Category: Latest News
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Great USA TODAY article
LINTHICUM, Md. — With boarding passes in hand, children with autism spectrum disorders and their families took part in an air-travel rehearsal at Baltimore-Washington International Thurgood Marshall Airport. Fifty families experienced a typical day at an airport, from check-in and security to receiving peanuts and pretzels from flight attendants onboard a Southwest Airlines jet for a 30-minute simulated "flight" that never left the gate.

IN-DEPTH: Children with special needs have 'dress rehearsal' for flying (Capital Gazette of Annapolis, Md.)

Rehearsals like this one originated with a Massachusetts-based chapter of The Arc, an advocacy organization for individuals with intellectual and developmental disabilities and their families, with the intention of alleviating some of the stress of air travel for children with autism.

http://www.usatoday.com/story/todayinthesky/2014/12/08/kids-with-autism-head-to-bwi-for-a-flight-to-ease-stress/20086329/
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  • Atef Tuesday, 19 May 2015 02:27

    Hot damn, loonkig pretty useful buddy.

  • Richa Saturday, 09 May 2015 08:34

    I think that yes, it's fair. As long as you have the support sytsem (emotional, social, financial) in place so that you will be able to care for both children, and provide for both of their needs which may be very different. As long as one of the kids is not neglected due to the needs of the other child, I think it could be a pretty fantastic experience for everyone involved I am an autistic and adopted only child parenting an autistic only child and I think that the one thing missing from our family is another child. If I were to adopt, I'd lean toward adopting a child with autism, as I can't imagine raising a non-autistic child or attempting to balance raising one of each (for lack of a better term). I wish we had the option to add another child to our family, but I feel like I'm strapped already (I have rheumatoid/autoimmune arthritis and spine damage). Hope this helps Let us know what you decide!

  • Phyllis Wolfram
    Phyllis Wolfram Friday, 26 December 2014 15:20

    great idea!

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